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shaddam

Millennium Mills - London - May 2013

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So This is my 5th visit to the place, if you don't know the history yet then visit my previous massive thread

:)http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/showthread.php/4607-Millennium-mills-4-visits-Pic-heavy!-2012

Anyway explored with Harry, Starlight and 1 non member, arrived at the site in the wee hours of the morning and made our way in.. access this time around was surprisingly easy with no one around we where very relaxed.

After helping Star after she made friends with a leap of faith and making sure she was ok after no realising her fear of heights ! [sorry ><] we made our way to the roof to be met with a foot deep water covered roof.. back in and to find an alternative staircase, not having to do this in the past made it more fun 'Shadd's .. you know where the ladder is ?' 'Nope d:' .. 'oh...' . Anywayyy on to the pics !

Lets star with a couple of rooftop photos

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Then got a quick shot of the process of a light painting shot

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with light approaching, we decided to head inside and make use of the morning sun

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The Cava from Nye ;]

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Pipe porn d:

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Now shortly after these photos, my camera took a rather large nock which defunked the aperture lever or light sensor resulting in all photos being near black unless at least 1 second exposure at isom 800 was used .. =/

The famous fans ;]

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peeking out

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looking out

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The last meal

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And a couple of exteriors

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The remains of the Pleasure gardens

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Rather let down with my camera as i wanted some HDR shots of the place, but a great explore none the less, thanks for coming you three !

Rest can be found here :http://www.flickr.com/photos/urdex/sets/72157633796240320/

Edited by shaddam

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Ah they are brilliant! Your rooftops ones are so clear and colourful, and the fans are cool :D

And you're forgiven, saved me the mental trauma of anticipating it, win!

Edited by starlight

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Guest Scattergun

Beastin set mate, brilliantly colourful nightscapes and really crisp details. Loved the older thread too but this one is a proper win :) Really need to get my arse there and get this done. Beautifully captured.

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