Jump to content
SuZyQue

A creepy abandoned doll factory spain

Recommended Posts

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By obscureserenity
      Campina Youth House
       
       
      Haven't seen this one posted anywhere so I decided to chuck a quick report up on it. I would say this particular location could be described as disused rather than abandoned, as it looked like there was redevelopment work going on when we arrived. Hence why it is so nice and pristine. Anyway, onto a little bit of history I found..
       
      History

      The Youth House was orginally built as a leisure centre in Campina. A city situated roughly around the South East of Romania. It was constructed by local authorites in order to create a space for young people to participate in a range of sporting activities such as: aerobics, matrial arts and boxing. It was also established in order to promote culture and education and the house provided various facilities for the arts. The Youth House hosted a large auditorium to  showcase fairs, exhibitions, conventions, concerts and festivals. 
       
       
      Visit

      Visited with @darbians and @Gigi on a long weekend trip to Romania. We were driving past and saw what we orginally thought was a hotel and decided to check it out. Finding this place was defintely an unsuspected susprise and I'm very glad we decided to pull over. I really enjoyed photographing this one and I espiecally liked the mosiacs which reminded me of the ones at Buzludzha I had seen the previous year. I hope you enjoy my report!
       
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
      When you find a window open on the top floor, gotta get a few photos from the roof 
       

       

       
       
      Thanks for reading!
       
    • By anthrax
      Founded in early 1800's the complex was initially used as a hand weaving mill. Following 30 years of manual work the means of production changed when the small mill was bought by a young interpreneur who changed the concept to include hydropower. A few years after that, the mill changed owners again when it was decided to enlargen the mill and convert it into a fully functional factory, instead of a small hydropower driven mill.
      Successively more and more looms and heavy machinery were added when a textile producer outsourced his production because of monetary advantages. During WW2 the production was stopped and the factory used for producing telecommunication materials for the military.
      Because of the decline of the texile industry in Europe and outdated machinery the factory had to close for good in the 2000's. Now it's slowly consumed by nature and open for urban explorers like me.
      Full Album: (70+ photographs) https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157669234673708/with/42217673072/
      Full Blog Post: http://inwordsandpictures.net/textilefactory

      DSC_7178 by anthrax, auf Flickr

      1

      DSC_7224 by anthrax, auf Flickr

      2

      DSC_7237 by anthrax, auf Flickr

      3

      DSC_7241_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr

      4

      DSC_7252 by anthrax, auf Flickr

      5

      DSC_7259 by anthrax, auf Flickr

      6

      DSC_7272 by anthrax, auf Flickr

      7

      DSC_7302 by anthrax, auf Flickr

      8

      DSC_7308 by anthrax, auf Flickr

      9

      DSC_7336 by anthrax, auf Flickr

      10

      DSC_7350 by anthrax, auf Flickr

      11

      DSC_7382 by anthrax, auf Flickr

      12

      DSC_7394 by anthrax, auf Flickr

      13

      DSC_7414 by anthrax, auf Flickr

      14

      DSC_7425 by anthrax, auf Flickr

      15

      DSC_7431 by anthrax, auf Flickr

      16
    • By Riding Japan
      need to add Japan in the flag section still
       
       
    • By obscureserenity
      Chateau Marianne / Chateau Alchimiste
       
       
      History
       
      Not much history on this location but it was rumoured to be have been once occupied by a former professor. The chateau is located in a small, rural town in France. The town's residents have halved in the last 40 years and it was beginning to look quite run down. I can imagine the nickname  'Alchimiste' (which means Alchemist in French) came from all the chemistry equipment left behind such as: test tubes, syringes, bottles, cylinders and beakers.  It seems the previous inhabitant was also a bit of an artist, we found many paintings scattered around the house and a large collection in the attic, as well as a small studio in an upstairs room. 
       
      Visit
       
      I visited this beautiful chateau on a euro trip with @PROJ3CTM4YH3M. We went the previous night to check to see if it was accessible and boy we were in for a shock! Neither of us realised how much stuff had been left and how interesting the contents were. We both particularly liked the framed butterfly collection which was hung up in one of the living rooms, as it reminded us of the film 'Silence of the Lambs.'  After a short investigation we decided to return the following day and booked a hotel in a nearby town.  Arriving the next morning once sun had risen, the place was really brought into it's element. So, as always, hope you enjoy my photos!
       
       

       

       

       

       
         
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
      If you got this far, thanks for reading.
    • By SouthCoastUrbex
      Hi all I'm back again!
       
      Today we went and visited an old boarding school in Chichester. We did not know if the place was abandoned but we got a tip to say it "might" be abandoned. Well...we went to check out this place and my god it has got to be one of the better ones I've been to. No graffiti onsite but just an awesome explore all in all!
       
      HISTORY:
       
      The site itself originally started life as a boarding school and has a full range of classrooms, studios and offices. They had an onsite IT room which could fit up to 20 students at a time and also 2 large greenhouses for training in horticultural skills. The centre itself was very highly-regarded in the area and was built within the grounds of a grade II listed house. It went on to become a residential educational and training centre until the site officially closed its doors in 2011.
       
      Enjoy the video and if you really liked it feel free to subscribe to our channel!
       
       
×