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silverainbow

Arch Cliff Cells & Galleries,Dover, May 2013

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Another one of those Ive been meaning to do for ages, Its normally one of those that people do early on in their explore career but I didnt for some reason, the time never felt right :), Visited With Ms Penfold, A little history can be found via this link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dover_Western_HeightsAnd so for a few PicsArchcliff039_zpsae32effc.jpgArchcliff019_zpsf80adfa7.jpgThanks for taking the time to look :thumb

Edited by Dubbed Navigator

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Nice one sr ive only crawled into the galeries if im honest but oneday will get round to the cells

:comp:

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Thanks for the compliments guys, these sites have kept me busy for the past couple of years prob is I'm running out of "local" things to do and really do prefer underground and military to anything else

;)

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