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The Royalty Cinema was taken over by the Associated British Cinemas(ABC) chain in March 1935. ABC closed the cinema on 2nd November 1963 with Cliff Robertson in "P.T.109". It was co, and in 2010 it is operating as a Gala Bingo Club.

In the summer of 2011, the Royalty Cinema was designated a Grade II Listed building by English Heritage...........Visited with - Host

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Edited by skeleton key

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Guest Scattergun

Probably the best set I've seen of this place yet, well done mate :)

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    • By lucan
      not much left , not vandalised and loads of decay and bird poo and dive bomming  pigeons,
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      on with the pics
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      thanks for looking
       
    • By AndyK!
      Visited with @The_Raw, @Pinkman, @Maniac and @extreme_ironing.
       
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      Spotted this while out and about so popped in for a look, not a great deal left behind
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