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Guest Dubbednavigator

Old royal mail office?

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Guest Dubbednavigator

Took a wrong turn the other day and noticed this, what looks like an old sorting office?

Anyone had a snout?

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I used to live just up the road there before I moved to the big smoke, it's been empty for a little while now, I'm amazed you've not come across this one earlier Dubbed! It certainly was sealed up tight and alarmed during the time I lived there, though last time I was in the area and was cutting through Castle Park I noticed there were a few fire engines parked outside so could be the local mouth-breathers have started chipping away at it.

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