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thecrazyfool

Tapioca Farm, Belgium – July, 2013

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Somewhere in the lush Belgium countryside lies Tapioca Farm abandoned and derelict. A time capsule of times past. The Farm feels like the Mary Celeste, where the owner has just left. His possessions lie there waiting to be reclaimed by him but not knowing that he has passed.....

It seems finding any history of this place is neigh impossible, but the place speaks for itself. Small but powerful with it's own history to tell.

Pictures:

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This place sums up all that is to be admired about Belgian explorers.

It has such a high footfall of people through it yet almost all of it has been left pretty much as-is since 1995. Despite how many people know where it is and it's comparative 'tourist' status amongst Belgian explorers it's still an incredible time capsule of a location, one of the very best there has been.

And yet there are still those who say we have no say over what happens to locations...

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Guest Scattergun

These little places continue to amaze me in the fact they're left untouched and forgotten, completely different mentality to the 'lets wreck it' attitude of the UK. Of course media coverage doesn't help. It's probably a good thing there's no history on the place, if it was well known it wouldn't look like that!

Excellent set mate.

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It's funny this place, I've heard horror stories of mad locals guarding it like hawks, then on my visit in March we walked straight in, and on the visit in July (where I chose to sleep in the car and talk to the horses) my group were about to go in but bumped into a woman outside who once she saw the cameras etc was fine...weird place.

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Guest Scattergun

Guess it's just who you meet. We bumped into a local at HF6 who didn't seem to remotely mind us being there once he realised we were just takiin pictures. I have a feeling site security might have taken a different approach, not that we saw any..

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