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Frosty

UK Cemex Tunnel - Rochester - (2013)

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Don't think theres any history other then it used to run from........somewhere, to the cement works in Rochester, Maniac will be able to tell you more lol, Mooched with, Maniac, Jesus, Jesus's mate, I don't know who the other one was lol. Enjoy the wafty layout of a big long tunnel! :D

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The echo in here is amazing :D. Cheers for looking, Frosty.

Edited by Maniac

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It's original purpose was to bring chalk from the quarry on one side of the hill through the hill to the cement works on the other. However the quarry was abandoned long before the cement works were and thus the tunnel was surplus to requirements. It used to have a conveyor running all the way through it, long since stripped out. I've measured this on Google maps before at around 500 metres long which is pretty impressive really. :)

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Great pics Frosty, interesting wee story too, shame it never got used, but all the better for the lieks of us!

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Yeah we went back a couple months back, someones made uh.........un necessary access lol.......i guess some people just dont want to use doors.........:P

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Yeah we went back a couple months back, someones made uh.........un necessary access lol.......i guess some people just dont want to use doors.........:P

Fair enough mate. I would have thought this would be long gone and the site developed by now. Was quite intersting for a long stright empty tunnel. Reminds me of Pre-Metro. Some nice shots. :thumb

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