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Trigg

Hi from North Shropshire

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Hello all, after browsing some of the amazing places on here I now wish that I had a camera on me all the time just I case I come across anywhere of interest! I have been to a few but never taken pictures. I shall start snapping from now on!!

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Welcome along mate..have a look in the forum see whats about and if in doubt use the search bar with the town your in..see what come up:)

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Hello - fairly new here myself.

Once you've been out there a few times you'll probably find you end up with a fairly long list of 'must visit' :)

Good luck ;)

Very true. And hello from me (originally from Oswestry!)

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  • Similar Content

    • By Jake Alan Crag
      Hey everyone, so I'm pretty sure everyone's heard of this place so i dont really need to explain much about it, but if you haven't, below is a brief history of Denbigh Mental Asylum.
       
      Grade 2 Listed building.
      Built work started in 1844
      Building work completed in 1848
       
      Built to house up to 200 patients with psychiatric illnesses. In the early 1900's it housed 1537 patients (Approx).
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      Planned for closure by Enoch Powellin the 1960's, however it only began closing in sections between 1991-1995.

       
      Nurses Quarters:

      This is genuinely one of the best condition buildings that i have ever explored.

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    • By farmer.ned
      this second part nearly didnt happen as when i arrived i found the yard had changed hands and was all set to write it off as a waste of time and head home untill i spotted something in the far corner of the yard and sought permission to take some photographs which was given by way of intercom so off i trotted across the yard camera in hand to find my subject.

      mass transit was founded in May 1998 by Michael Strafford an engineering business, performing contract maintenance for other operators. It also specialised in the conversion of buses for non-passenger use. It then diversified into the operation of school bus services At the time operations ceased it operated 86 routes serving 32 schools and at its peak carried some 15,000 children a day to and from schools across south yorkshire and lincolnshire
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      The Grantham operation failed under Mass ownership and was sold to centrebus and the Lincoln area operations to dunn line in 2005

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      mass/transit now brightbus disposed of the elderly leon and northern bus fleets which had kept the stage carriage and school services going and ran
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      a rather scruffy mass transit bus possibly filling in between school runs heads for hexthorpe near doncaster 

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      a wider view of the hong kong tri axles sandwich in a leyland olympian

       
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      hong kong BIG 9823 which moved to leon finningley for a short time and C887 RFE parked at the rear of the yard near the inspection ramps

      viewed through the fence american schoolbus GHL 212 V in the yard

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      the former bus repair sheds now used for storage

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      looking down the bus it smelt like one of the museum type buses a unused shut in smell not unpleasant

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    • By farmer.ned
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