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The Elusive

UK Beaudesert hall.. well .. bits of wall..(visted dec 13)

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I would imagine this place must have been amazing to see, in its hayday. its rumoured to have had 24 peacock shaped topiary in the gardens. Here some history courtesy of wiki.

Beaudesert was an estate and stately home on the southern edge of Cannock Chase in Staffordshire.

It was one of the family seats of the Paget family, the Marquesses of Anglesey.

The estate was obtained by William Paget, 1st Baron Paget in 1546; the family's other main seat is at Plas Newydd.

The estate was broken up by the 6th Marquess of Anglesey due to financial difficulties; as a result the furniture was sold off

and the fabric of the hall and stables went to auction.

Some of the furnishings of the house, including oak panelling and the Waterloo Staircase were taken to Carrick Hill in Adelaide,

South Australia. Demolition began in 1935; however, it was never completed and some ruins remain standing.

Today some of the former estate land is used as a Scout and Guide camp and a local wildlife trust and new buildings are used

for residential courses. The Grand Lodge built in 1814 still stands at the entrance on Horsey Lane, east of the ruins.

The ruins were protected with Grade II listed building status in 1953.

Currently The Beaudesert Trust which owns the remains and gardens is applying to stabilise the ruins and restore the gardens

to their original state. The standing ruins consist of three main components; the south wall of the Great Hall,

a parallel wall which formed the north side of the Great Hall with an attached fragment of the west wing and the north west

angle of the house. The south wall still retains something of its 15th century character, including some good quality ashlar masonry,

the principal windows, a window lighting the dais, and the remains of a possible fireplace, also associated with the dais.[5]

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Looking for santa, he wasnt up there :(

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Evil rabbit tree..

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scouty stuff me thinks..

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Cheers! Im gonna go back in the summer and hook up me hammock chair overlooking the lake... cant wait theres something about cannock chase, such a beautiful place Im so lucky to live so close :)

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Some things just aren't meant to be, like this place I spose! Lovely pics thanks for sharing, it does look like a nice place for a wander, I'd have to check out the scouty stuff tower thing too :)

Thanks guys,

yeah I would have too but this place is in a gps and reception hole and the light was fading fast, :)

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