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Russia Unfinished metro tunnels, February 2014.

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Hey people! Unfortunately I don't have enough time to read all posts here and to chat with people as much as I want. But I hope you excuse me!

:rolleyes:

Today I show you unfinished metro tunnels in my city. The project was started in 80s, but later was frozen because of lack of money.

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I don't believe that we will ever use our subway. Some years ago it was easy to penetrate in the tunnels.

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But now there is some activity here, it became almost impossible to get in. The consequences of fail may be really heavy.

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But we never say impossible.

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The tablet says "to the surface".

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Very big door to the collection of them:p

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The lift to the future station.

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And some more photos from the flooded shaft.

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And the look of my camera... It's very very dirty!:(

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Can you share some "dirty" stories and funny situations in which your equipment or you look the same?:o

Thank you for attention!

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