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Timster1973

Germany Partischule N / DDR Horshal - visited March 2014

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Morning all,

Second visit to this large complex of buildings after the first time was a fail due to not getting access.

This building is just one of a large complex of buildings which were built in the 1930's as National Socialistic Political Educational Institution during the Third Reich period in Nazi Germany.

After the fall of the Third Reich it has been in use as a school, to house a Ministery and boarding school.

Camerashy posted the image below from Google earth as the outbuildings were designed and look like the 'SS' of the Schutzstaffel - maybe just a coincidence??

Part of the building from Google Earth forms the ‘SS’ symbol of the Schutzstaffel who were a major paramilitary organization under Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party (NSDAP). It began at the end of 1920 as a small, permanent guard unit known as the “Saal-Schutz†(Hall-Protection) made up of NSDAP volunteers to provide security for Nazi Party meetings in Munich. Later, in 1925, Heinrich Himmler joined the unit, which had by then been reformed and renamed the “Schutzstaffelâ€Â. Under Himmler’s leadership (1929–45), it grew from a small paramilitary formation to one of the largest and most powerful organizations in the Third Reich. Built upon the Nazi ideology, the SS under Himmler’s command was responsible for many of the crimes against humanity during World War II (1939–45). The SS, along with the Nazi Party, was declared a criminal organization by the International Military Tribunal, and banned in Germany after 1945.

This may be purely coincidental but despite its history and what has passed its there still remaining, in good condition after many years.

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There was less decay than I would normally like to see but was an impressive place to photograph with a lot of history even though negative.

On with the photos.

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11.

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Thanks for looking

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