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Ghostpast

Belgium Agnus Dei, june 2013/may 2014

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2 visits to this location. The first time after 5 minutes some german explorers where entering the Chapel, so i planned a revisit. The second time there were (again :() 7 germans in the chapel.

They were busy with a photoshoot, clothing, models and junk were scattered all around, so i didnt even tried to get a picture of it. Maybe i go for a third visit :D

It was a small nursing house with chapel, somewhere in Belgium. After a fire destroyed a part of the nursing house, it was abandoned.

This set is made up from 2 visits:

1:

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2:

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3:

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4:

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5:

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6:

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Edited by Stussy
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