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Infraredd

France Atlantic wall (bits of) 2014

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Atlantic wall.

Discovered these whilst driving west of Calais whilst waiting for my ferry back to the UK

No idea what this used to be - there are a few of these in the landscape & most have been taken over by the local farmers.

15076410597_cf12d0144b_c.jpgOpen bunker 01 by Infraredd, on Flickr

15076411888_9159cdf53a_c.jpgOpen bunker 02 by Infraredd, on Flickr

15076279370_e507e56124_c.jpgOpen bunker 03 inside by Infraredd, on Flickr

This is also part of the same defensive structure

15259880301_056211da78_c.jpgdb 1 by Infraredd, on Flickr

15076405608_49c349b877_c.jpgdb 3 by Infraredd, on Flickr

15076406588_1302e08165_c.jpgdb 4 by Infraredd, on Flickr

15076407638_8b97a00203_c.jpgdb 6 by Infraredd, on Flickr

15076274740_ab5a2c3552_c.jpgdb 7 by Infraredd, on Flickr

15262974365_cc522f82f3_c.jpgdb 8 by Infraredd, on Flickr

15076225879_9c9b5a685f_c.jpgdb 10 by Infraredd, on Flickr

15076409527_5952fcdf0e_c.jpgdb 11 by Infraredd, on Flickr

15259886231_6913de05bb_c.jpgdb 12 by Infraredd, on Flickr

This is what a similar bunker looks like restored and museumefied

15239959266_48f909426b_c.jpgBatterie 01 by Infraredd, on Flickr

15259876131_001812bace_c.jpgBatterie 02 by Infraredd, on Flickr

15076399937_5257cbd67d_c.jpgBatterie 03 by Infraredd, on Flickr

15259877501_74a6268d0b_c.jpgBatterie 05 Armoury by Infraredd, on Flickr

15259879361_2611c3d014_c.jpgBatterie 09 Rail gun by Infraredd, on Flickr

Thanks for looking.

Edited by skeleton key

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