Jump to content
Session9

UK Pig Research Centre, Stotfold - March 2015

Recommended Posts

PIG RESEARCH CENTRE, STOTFOLD

*** WARNING ***

THE AUTHOR WILL TAKE NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE INEVITABLE PIG RELATED REFERENCES IN THIS REPORT. THESE REFERENCES MAY PASS AS 'HUMOUR' OR MAY CAUSE OFFENCE DUE TO THEIR CRINGE WORTHY NATURE AND INSENSITIVE INCLUSION

History

The UK pig industries Development Unit, just outside Stotfold in Bedfordshire was opened by Lord Belstead, Minister of State (Lords), Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Foods in November 1984.

Over the years it underwent many changes but was always at the forefront of research firmly aimed at delivery of practical opportunities, work which could be quickly disseminated and implemented on working pig farms.

At its peak the unit employed 10 staff and had 300 sows. However major changes in the industry and a fundamental shift in the strategy of the British Pig Executive (BPEX) meant it was no longer needed and over the last six months of its life was gradually wound down

The final piece of research work was completed in May 2007, and the site closed sometime in July 2007

A BPEX Director of Pig Industry Development said at the time: "Stotfold has been a huge asset to the industry over the years and we are sad to see it go. "BPEX carried out a major review of its research and development and unfortunately Stotfold didn't fit into the new perspective."

The explore

I have been putting this off for ages and ages, despite living in snorting distance. I guess it never looked very inspiring and reports just showed a right pig's ear of place. Seeing a friend in nearby Ayrsley (i thought about asking if she would like to join me for a swell time, but tactfully this did not happen) meant there was no excuse, so off i trotted:

16591132928_ecc3479ce6_c.jpg

1. This was the best part of the joint (sorry..).

16158785543_2ed30ffa45_c.jpg

2. I like this shot, this brought back the bacon for me.

16156409074_b37539f3be_c.jpg

3. This photo was a bit sloppy though.

16777631822_be5aa6f9cd_c.jpg

4. Outside accommodation for the less privileged swines.

16156406464_26e147c1e0_c.jpg

5.

16156405744_5b942ea56e_c.jpg

6.

16777627162_2f2bcdc9fb_c.jpg

7.

16571445147_a0e259ca09_c.jpg

8.

16777623902_67dfc7177f_c.jpg

9.

16592566309_202578be29_c.jpg

10.

16158777983_46a67825ff_c.jpg

11.

16778715835_1b9159d8d0_c.jpg

12. The remains of piggy abattoir, clearly this has been smoked.

Ok, this mooch will not tickle every ones ribs, but i actually quiet liked it here and despite the main buildings in hock (i really mean lock) down, not a bad wee gander at something a little different.

So, of i chopped (last one i promise), to have a mooch around the nearby Fairfield Hospital (now named Fairfield Park):

16174240274_843a9f8d8d_c.jpg

13. Fairfield Hospital had the longest corridor at half a mile long in the country. It also had a very long driveway from Arlesey village and the then railway station which was closed and reopened further towards Biggleswade in the 1990's.

16796549705_25032d93e2_c.jpg

14. A lovely old weighbridge situated half way along the driveway. That's about it for anything remotely abandoned here; there is a chapel that looks empty, but is sealed tight and situated right in the middle of busy suburbia.

16608980498_6339eee419_c.jpg

15. Opened in 1860 and closed in 1999, Fairfield Hospital (later named The Three Counties Hospital) replaced Bedford Asylum to cater for more accommodation.

16608982308_0d065f0cce_c.jpg

16. All the buildings are now converted for middle managers and the like, but back in the day all this greeted you. A full compliment of security on a pole at every turn. How i wish i had tried harder!

16770699706_b536d26237_c.jpg

17. Certainly impressive buildings and pleasing to see so much has been retained.

16589266497_dc5da7894a_c.jpg

18. Into the airing court.

Many thanks for looking and thank god those pig jokes have finally bitten the dust (or the leftovers) :).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

F'ing quality mate!!! really enjoyed reading that oink oink. That weighbridge :Gulp:

Number 10 sounds like my rooftop error in leeds, and 11 like the mortar tubes/smoke dispensers on a tank haha. Cracking report, bet that took a while :thumb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
F'ing quality mate!!! really enjoyed reading that oink oink. That weighbridge :Gulp:

Number 10 sounds like my rooftop error in leeds, and 11 like the mortar tubes/smoke dispensers on a tank haha. Cracking report, bet that took a while :thumb

Cheers bud :)

Yep, its taken me the best of one evening to write this slop hahaha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Regardless to living in snorting distance its nice to see you bringing home the Bacon :P

Oh very good SK, glad you didn't find the report too HAM fisted :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool stuff! Liking the converted hospital as well looks like it would of made a great explore. Sorry couldn't come up with a pig pun :-|

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cool stuff! Liking the converted hospital as well looks like it would of made a great explore. Sorry couldn't come up with a pig pun :-|

Thanks bud. Unfortunately The Three Counties Hospital was incredibly tight back in the day, sadly. In hindsight, think i would have taken more of a risk. Don't worry about a pig pun, i'm not going to rib anyone anymore (predictable and sorry...) :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brilliant report mate. The place looks huge!

Cheers mate. It is huge, room for about 300 of our pink friends back in the day (not to stereotype pigs that they are all one colour) :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks bud. Unfortunately The Three Counties Hospital was incredibly tight back in the day, sadly. In hindsight, think i would have taken more of a risk. Don't worry about a pig pun, i'm not going to rib anyone anymore (predictable and sorry...) :(

Haha, still can't think of one :unfair: it's shameful really am usually full of bad jokes...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By lucan
      Not much left , not vandalised and loads of decay and bird poo and dive bomming  pigeons,
      been closed a few years now 
      on with the pics
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      thanks for looking
       
    • By jones-y-gog
      This is where Henry lived with his wife Mary and their only child, a daughter. Mary died a long time ago and Henry had to move in with his daughter who looks after him. He is 98 years old. After much persuasion he finally agreed that this, the family home must be sold. 
       
      Henry was a hard-working man with strong moral principles. He's been a prominent member of his local chapel all his life. Among his paperwork includes a certificate dated January 1940 confirming him on the register of Conscientious Objectors. Interestingly he must have had to attend a formal interview to justify his beliefs so had written prepared answers based on questions he thought the authorities might ask, along with character references.  Also there was a letter dated September 1976 congratulating him on 25 years service to the BBC as a gardener. 
       
      This is not just an abandoned house - its a home. In this home are meaningful and treasured possessions but also a home full of memories. This was a sanctuary from the outside world, a place to lead a simple life. 
       
      [Note - I wrote the above in 2017]
       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       

       
       
    • By AndyK!
      Visited with @The_Raw, @Pinkman, @Maniac and @extreme_ironing.
       
      History
      The Brent oil field, off the north-east coast of Scotland is one of the largest fields in the North Sea. Discovered in 1971, it was one of the most significant oil and gas finds made in the UK sector. Brent field production peaked in 1982 when over half a million barrels of oil and 26 million cubic meters of gas were produced… every day!
       
      The Brent oil field was served by four large platforms owned by Shell – Alpha, Bravo, Charlie and Delta. Each platform has a ‘topside’ which is visible above the waterline and houses the accommodation block, helipad, as well as drilling and other operational areas. The topsides sit on much taller supporting structures, or ‘legs’, which stand in 140 metres of water and serve to anchor the topsides to the sea bed.
       
      By 1976 Brent Bravo had started production, and later that year the second platform, Brent Delta was installed, which started production in 1977. Delta weighed 24,000 tonnes (the same as 2,000 London busses!) and the platform alone was as tall as the London Eye.
       
      The Brent field has reached the stage where production is no longer economically viable and decommissioning is underway. In 2011 Brent Delta stopped production. After 5 years of planning and 2 years of preparations, the entire Brent Delta platform was cut free from its supporting legs and brought ashore in one piece, where it will be dismantled and scrapped.
       

      Brent Delta Platform after being brought ashore in Hartlepool


      On the helipad


      View across the deck with the derrick and flare stack towering above


      More detailed view of the topdeck, where drilling activities were carried out


      View across the deck


      View in the other direction towards the crane


      Derrick and flare stack


      On the top deck where the drilling happened


      Hook and winch equipment


      The “doghouse” where drilling operations were controlled


      Heading below deck we find a workshop


      And various plant rooms




      There were various rooms for deployment of workers




      Sick bay


      The workers accommodation was pretty basic


      Central control room




      The engine room was tucked away below the accommodation block




      One of the emergency lifeboats


      Sign on the side of the platform
    • By lucan
      all that remains of a decoy airfield 
      small bunker type construction with a searchlight mounted on top  and a small room at the back to house a gennerator
      fires would have been light at night at this location to fool the german bombers to target here instead of  the real site a few miles away
      the searchlight platform is now fallien off and just a pile of bricks and metal
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      thanks for looking
    • By lucan
      Spotted this while out and about so popped in for a look, not a great deal left behind
      In the middle of a small town on the Shropshire border
      Had to be fairly quiet as it is surrounded by houses
      Looks like its not been lived in for a couple of years
      A stable block out back, loads of TV sets and old Playstation mags , one of which gives the name I gave the place
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
      thanks for looking
×