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Urban Explorer Dies In Storm drain - March - 2015

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    • By Landie_Man
      The Explore
      I actually explored this about eight weeks ago with Southside.  I drove to Slough, Parked up and he had kindly found the way in before I got to the University Campus.
      The site is massive, and right in the centre of Slough.  I work fairly close to Slough, and had seen the site some weeks before when collecting lunch from Roosters Piri Piri just opposite the site.  
      It's kind of strange that its sat here for so long; its very close to London and land in this general area is typically very, very expensive.  That does not of course, make Slough a pleasant place...
      I think there was a bit of an increase of traffic here after my visit, I have only just got around to editing these!  Its amazing how such a large site has sat beneath the radar for such a long time!!!
       
      The Site
      Thames Valley University or TVU as its known; is part of the University of West London and formed part of a conglomerate of several campuses in Reading and West London. 
      The closure of this Campus was announced in 2009 and the doors finally closed it's doors in 2010.  The site has now fallen into disuse and it's 1000 students had to re-locate to other campuses around West London.
       
      Closure was blamed on the recession/credit crunch at the time; forcing the sale of the site.
       
      "Professor Peter John, TVU vice-chancellor, said: 'For the majority of students the closure of the campus will mean a move to one of our other locations either in Reading or West London. All those affected will be fully supported through the transition to minimise any possible disruption to their studies.' A total of 650 pre-registration nursing students at the Slough campus will be provided with a provisional timetable and have been told to pack their bags for the move to Reading by December this year."
       
      The site consists of two tower blocks (7 stories high), a ground floor canteen, a small circular building named "The Rotunda" which houses the University's Srudent Uninon, and a 2 story admin block.
      Plans were announced in 2017 to redevelop the site into 1,400 homes, but so far nothing has happened. Currently the site is owned by the Slough Council. 
       
      It was a surprisingly relaxed explore.  The road outside was very, very busy and all could be heard on the street outside.  There were incredibly recent signs of a squat inside one of the rooms; fresh new sleeping bags and food dated for that day in bags; sandwiches, fruit etc.  I could hear someone inside who I believe left when they heard us.   
       
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      Thanks for reading!
       
      More At:
      https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157696167343975
    • By Landie_Man
      Visited with Mookster on a small short road trip around the midlands back in March.  This site was absolutely wrecked throughout and of little interest.  An 80s style factory which closed sometime in 2016.  But it was still an explore!
       
      James Thomas Engineering was started in a small garage in Bishampton England in 1977. The business grew and moved to a converted office unit, to a much larger 5000 square foot unit in 1980. 
      This planted the seeds for a new industry leader in aluminium all purpose truss design. By 1983, James Thomas developed a pre-rigged truss design used by major rock bands on world tours.
       
      By 1990, JTE began manufacturing in the USA to keep truss design moving on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. Come 1992, the super truss system was designed. The Company was Liquidated in 2017
       
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      More At:
      https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157694367095931
    • By obscureserenity
      Red Morgue Hospital
       
       
      History

      I couldn't find huge amount history on this location but from what I've gathered the hospital was built at some point in the early 20th century. It was funded by investors and at a time when nursing care was predominately carried out by the clergy. They wanted the hospital to become more secular in order to distance themselves from the church. 

      The hospital was mainly used for surgery and featured several operating theatres but later on a maternity ward and outpatient clinic was introduced. About 90 years later the orginal hospital building was combined with a larger nearby hospital. The Red Morgue hospital was eventually closed around 2013. By this time it was only used to see outpatients, as most of it's services were provided by the new hospital which was more modern and sophisticated. 
       
       
      Visit
       
      Visited with @darbians on a weekend trip to Belgium. I was really keen to see this one after finding out about it and seeing a few photographs. It was great to see an old hospital in fairly good condition with some items still left, combined with a nice bit of decay.  As always,  hope you enjoy my photos ?
       
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      (Spot the rookie error ?)
       
       
      If you've got this far, thanks for reading!
    • By obscureserenity
      St Josephs Orphanage / Mount Street Hospital  
       
       
      Even though this location has already been done by every man and his dog, I decided to chuck a quick report up anyway. As stated above in the title of my report, this one features photographs taken mostly on the first visit and one taken on another which will become clear towards the end. 
       
       
      History

      St Joseph's Orphanage was designed by architect R.W Hughes in the style of gothic architecture, which was typical of that particular era. The construction work was endowed by Maria Holland, a wealthy widow, who contributed a sum of 10,000 to achieve this. She wanted to care for the sick, at a time when Preston had the highest mortality rate in the UK. This was predominately due to inadequate housing and the poor working conditions in the local mills and factories. The orphanage was first officially opened in the September of 1872 and five years later it became St Joseph's Institute for the Sick & Poor. The hospital accommodated for around 25 patients and was run by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady Mother of Mercy. Voluntary contributions funded the maintenance and general upkeep of the hospital and it was also the first provider of welfare to Roman Catholic girls in Preston.
       
      In 1910 the hospital was granted its first operating theatre, as well as the chapel being built that same year. By 1933 a new wing was added and another in 1958 which was officiated by Princess Marina, the Duchess of Kent. During both world wars it served as a military hospital to treat wounded British and Dutch soldiers. One of St Joe's most famous patients was performer George Formby who died of a heart attack at the hospital in 1961. The hospital eventually closed its doors in 1982. It was then bought by its current owner who converted it into a care home until 2003. A year later in 2004, plans were proposed to convert the building into 82 flats with a grant of £2m but the redevelopement never seemed to happen. Presently 3 sections of the site are still classified as grade II listed and the building was recently featured on the Victorian Society's 'top most at risk historic buildings in the UK.' 
       
       
      Visit
       
      Visited with @scrappy. This one has been on my to do list since I really started exploring but I never got round to doing it until recently. Despite being pretty fucked from years of neglect, local kids, general arseholes etc, I did still quite enjoy seeing this one finally. The main purpose of my visit was photographing a newly discovered section which certainly didn't disappoint, as well as the operating lights being rather pretty too (so glad no one has smashed those up yet.) All in all still a fairly nice location and worth popping by if you're in the area. As always, hope you enjoy my report!
       
       
       

       

       

       
       
      Started tidying up my photos of the chapel and went a little overboard...
       

       

       

       

       
      (Obligatory hospital wheelchair photo...)
       

       

       

       
       
      Now onto the best part 
       

       

       
       
      Once we found out all the doors had been mysteriously removed we decided to go back again for more photos. 
       

       
       
      If you've got this far, thanks for reading!
    • By franconiangirl
      On first sight, there´s only a plain building hidden between bushes and coniferes. It´s located on the grounds of a former Soviet military base in Germany. It seems to be like other barracks, nothing special. Yet, while approaching the barrack, attached high walls with barbed wire appear forming a small yard. Rustling branches of the trees which are now growing all over the yard and an icy wind add to the somewhat eerie atmosphere. On entering the building, the darkness is starting to hit you in an instant. Only sparse light shines in. Additionally, the walls were painted with dark and unfriendly colours. Surely, not without reason - simple, yet efficient psychologial means. Here, at the latest, the purpose of the building becomes crystal-clear: it was used as a jail by the Soviet occupiers. What kind of offenses were punished with a stay inside one of these dark cells with bald walls - only equipped with some wooden plank beds - is unknown. 

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