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mookster

Canadian Salvage Yard - March 2015

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Honey I'm hooooooooomeeeee!

I've spent the last 19 days going on various jaunts around America so have been absent from the forum (love the new look in black btw). My first port of call was checking in with my good mate in Buffalo, New York for the first weekend and a trip we had planned for some time, to an amazing junkyard located in the middle of the Canadian wilderness. And oh man was this a slog - one of the most challenging explores I have ever done, not because of the access but because of the weather. Spending five and a half hours walking around fields full of knee deep snow covered in half a centimetre of ice, with every step you take involving said ice impacting your shins is very painful indeed. After five hours I realised my feet had finally succumbed to the cold and wet - my jeans had frozen solid from the knees down, and the snow had compacted in the folds and subsequently soaked my thick woollen socks from the top down into my shoes leaving me standing in freezing cold puddles in my shoes.

But what a place. The most amazing collection of scrap I have ever seen - 1000s of cars, trucks, buses, vans, pickups, campers, literally everything you could possibly imagine from the 1940s through to the 1990s is spread out over numerous fields and woodlands on this guys property - 99% of it being American and the vast majority from the 1950s and 60s. Totally worth it, and you can rest assured I'll be back when there is no snow...as it somewhat limited the stuff I could take photos of sadly.

I'm going to try and keep the amount of photos sensible but even in the conditions, I took 150...

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This extremely rare hard top camper was my favourite thing in the whole place. Pure 1960s cool.

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My second favourite thing in the whole yard, an example of which I had wanted to see for years - a GMC 'Fishbowl' bus.

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Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157651544603365/

I've got some truly awesome stuff to post up over the coming few days so watch this space!

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Great to see you back Mooks and glad you had a cracking time mate.

Seen the odd pic pop up on Face ache and looked forwards to you posting in full.

I was going to say you could have got the snaow shovel out but it kinda add to the shots.

Dare I say cool share :P

:comp:

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