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darbians

UK Buxton Crescent December 2014

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While doing a bit of research I found a couple of good leads. This was the first one I followed up. Rolling solo an early start got me here in full darkness. As I was going in with no info and didnt really want a wasted three hour drive. Quite a bit of cctv around but I worked out a reasonable route through the grounds and luckily it worked out all good.

The Crescent was designed by John Carr and built in the late 18th century Funded by the Fifth Duke Of Devonshire as the centre piece for his spa Scheme.

Originally two hotels one closed early in the 20th century and became council offices and library closed in 1992. The St Anns hotel closed in 1992 and has been empty since.

Anyway on with some photos.

Luckily most of it is lit inside so I was shooting straight away.

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Shame the stairs are covered I think they could of been rather nice.

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So I had kind of forgotten what had drawn me to this building. It was seeming a bit stripped inside. Then I was reminded as I walked through the doors at the top of the round staircase.

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A couple more bits were worth shooting

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So it turns out there was more than I expected here...

Right next door is or was a natural water spring the current builing was built in 1853 and was altered in the 1920s. The pump room was last used in the 1970's. Some of the building was used as the tourist information Centre.

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Who needs the jungle school when you can have a jungle pool.

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Thanks for looking I hope you enjoyed.

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Oh my gosh this place looks seriously epic, who needs Belgium? :D

Ha ha. I still need Belgium.

Really pleased about the bath house thing, that was a nice surprise :)

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Looks a good place this and nice pictures, im close to this in a few weeks i may take a look. Still a lot to see in this country :)

Edited by Lenston

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Woah great pictures and a great place! I know this building - not sure what its like now though. They were meant to be doing it up but kept hitting problems.

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