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UK Gwrych Castle, Abergele - March 2015

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Gwrych Castle

The Explore

Arrived here after an unfortunate fail at our primary location. Frustrating that after arriving there at 1am we had gained access at 3 separate points only to find they had internally sealed the room leaving you having to climb back out again, on this occasion through some testicle crunching gaps. But oh well, i’m really happy i went to this castle for a quick mooch with Session9. A great day all in all but with only a 50% success rate but i suppose thats how it goes sometimes, you can’t win them all, believe me we tried! Was nice to smash in a Ginsters and Monster whilst taking in the view of the beautiful North Welsh coast.

What it would've looked like in the day..

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The History

Local history claims that the first castle at Gwrych was built by the Normans in the 12th century. The later castle at Gwrych was begun in 1819. The castle is a Grade 1 listed building set in a wooded hillside over looking the Irish Sea. It was the first Gothic folly to be built in Europe by a wealthy industrialist Lloyd Hesketh. Bamford Hesketh, his son, inherited the title of Gwrych in his early 20s and used his vast fortune to build the 4,000-acre Gwrych Castle Estate.

The castle once had a total of 128 rooms including the outbuildings, including twenty-eight bedrooms, an outer hall, an inner hall, two smoke rooms, a dining room, a drawing room, a billiards room, an oak study, and a range of accommodations for servants. There are nineteen embattled towers and the whole facade is over 2000 yards. Many feel the castle's outstanding feature was the castle's 52-step marble staircase. Shame to see it left to ruin nowadays.

The Pictures

1. External Pano

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2.

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3.

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4,5.

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6.

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7. Views from the top..

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8.

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9.

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10.

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11.

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12. A couple of GoPro stills to end with..

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13.

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As always thanks for looking :thumb

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Spot on HT :thumb 4 and 5 are cool. Gopro stills are nice also. Good to hear that you enjoyed a feast fit for a king while enjoying the view mate:)

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Belated thanks for all your kind comments everyone! Such a nice historical place in a picturesque part of the UK, would highly recommend a visit :thumb

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Always loved a decent castle and North Wales is the Daddy of castles. Thing is though, most are owned and looked after by CADW, not many are totally abandoned. I guess a decade or so of decay would be more than enough to make most buildings a wreck, but when the disrepair ranks in hundreds of years there wouldn't normally be an awful lot left to view.

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