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Andy

Other The 20s Hotel (Sweden, visited 07/2010)

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A few older photos (summer 2010) of an abandoned hotel from the 20s in Sweden.

Although the quality of the images is not the best, but I think the place is worth to be shown.

part one

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Thank you. :) In view of the size of the building I had there very little time. Only a little more than two hours, due to the time of departure of our ferry. That's why I ran there through the rooms like a maniac and have photographed very, very quickly, to see as much as possible. I really was out of breath after that... But it was worth it. :)

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Excellent set considering the lack of time...a shame that :/

So many bits left makes a very interesting place, even some Pripyat style bed frames too!!

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Looks like a fantastic place Andy, the 'quality of your shots' is bloody brilliant as usual! :D

Thank you. But in original size you can see the higher ISO and that some photos are not very sharp. But I had to hurry and had little time; for this reason, I've choosen these camera settings. And for that, the images are ok.

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