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MrT

UK Pelhams Pillar, Caistor May 2015

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Ive been trying to get inside here for years (without a crowbar) Bank holiday Monday and it presented itself. It was permission, visit with my daughter and the dog. It saved me sneaking around for a change, hope you enjoy report as much as I did getting in. Some history for you taken from interweb :D

The Pillar is in North Lincolnshire on part of the Yarborough estate at Brocklesby, and is a viewing tower built to enable the earls to view the estate. It is 39 metres (128 ft) high and is guarded by two stone lions at the door. It is said that, when it was built, everything that could be seen from the top belonged to Charles Anderson-Pelham.

The pillar was erected to commemorate the planting of the surrounding woods by Charles Anderson-Pelham Lord Yarborough who started planting in 1787. Between that year and 1828 placed on his property 12,552,700 trees.

The foundation was laid by his son in 1840 and his grandson finished the building in time for Prince Albert's visit in 1849.

Total spend came to £2,395 4s.3d.

It was given a Grade two listed status in 1 November 1966.

On with the images.

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Not to everyone's interest, but im enjoying getting these local explores ticked off.

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Its great to see local historical places of interest and if honest wish more would take the time to document and share.

Im so glad (without a crowbar) lol

Looks cool that Mick and nice shots :thumb

:comp:

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Thanks guys, due to recovering from surgery I've been choosing the easier local heritage explores, some quality little things about that people forget about. Walking longer and climbing higher slowly but surely, you can't beat the harder technical ones. But do enjoy this type . Been here a few times, always new door or boards, loads of bits on this Hugh estate

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Hope you recover soon mate :thumb

If you're ever passing Lincoln gimme a shout :)

Thanks, will do. Just moved from Lincoln after 36 years.

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That upshot of the stairs is cool. Nicer in there than I imaged. Good work mate.

Thanks dude. Yeah was happy to finally get in, worth the trip for sure.

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At the place where i come from we have a saying (how do you say that?!) "wie het kleine niet eert, is het grote niet weerd". It means, who isnt satisfied with the small, little and tiny bits, isnt worthy of the big ones. I love local explores, and glad that someone is taking the time and effort to visit them. Great job, love the stairs and nice view from the top! :D

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At the place where i come from we have a saying (how do you say that?!) "wie het kleine niet eert, is het grote niet weerd". It means, who isnt satisfied with the small, little and tiny bits, isnt worthy of the big ones. I love local explores, and glad that someone is taking the time and effort to visit them. Great job, love the stairs and nice view from the top! :D

Love that comment

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Some great pictures there... Viewed many times though it's so peaceful to just sit beside and listen to the silence. Love the stair shot! 

Edited by Urbexbandoned
Removed request for access.

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