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stoozie

Selly Oak Hospital & Mortuary June 2015

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Decided it was time to get out exploring again so sorted out a visit to Selly Oak as its been on my list for ages. Met up with two other explorers on the day and had a good look around. Getting into the mortuary is a bit risky but so worth it!

History

The first buildings on the site of Selly Oak Hospital were those of the King's Norton Union Workhouse. It was a place for the care of the poor and was one of many workhouses constructed throughout the country following the introduction of the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834. This act replaced the earlier system of poor relief, dating from 1601.

The hospital closed in 2012 upon completion of the new Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Relocation of the first services from Selly Oak began during the summer of 2010 when its A&E department moved to the new Q.E.Hospital on 16 June and over the next 7 days Critical Care and other departments moved step-by-step the 1.5 miles to the new hospital. On average one inpatient was moved every 5 minutes between 7 am and early evening. On the morning of 23 May 2010 a 'Service of Thanks' was held at Selly Oak Hospital to celebrate a century of caring and this was followed by a fun fair at which staff and patients were invited to "Take a Trip Down Memory Lane", sign a memory wall and contribute to an on-line memories website. The reorganisation was first planned in 1998 though it was not until October 2004 that planning approval was given by Birmingham City Council, with construction beginning during 2006.

Pictures

Mortuary

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Outpatients X-Ray

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Main Hospital

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More pictures up here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/stuarthomas/sets/72157654300167915

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Nice pictures mate, really like that window shot in the chapel of rest!

Safe to say the morgue access was dodgy indeed, but we got there in the end:thumb

Was a good day, cheers for the company:Devil:

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Quality set of pictures there mate. Cheers for sharing :thumb

I'm intrigued about hearing stories about dodgy morgue access lately as we breezed in a month or so ago. They must've had a bit of a seal fest :)

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Thanks for all your replies :D

Nice pictures mate, really like that window shot in the chapel of rest!

Safe to say the morgue access was dodgy indeed, but we got there in the end:thumb

Was a good day, cheers for the company:Devil:

Thanks for your company too! Hope to explore with you again.

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Quality set of pictures there mate. Cheers for sharing :thumb

I'm intrigued about hearing stories about dodgy morgue access lately as we breezed in a month or so ago. They must've had a bit of a seal fest :)

There are a couple of ways in, both as dodgy as each other but one way only requires one person to do some crazy stuff then the rest can breeze in ;)

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There are a couple of ways in, both as dodgy as each other but one way only requires one person to do some crazy stuff then the rest can breeze in ;)

Unfortunately, I was the guy that ended up doing the crazy stuff;)

Definitely worth it though!:thumb

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I quite like the sound of this crazy access :D Really nice shots there Stoozie :thumb

If you do try the crazy way all I'll say is 'don't drop it!'

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