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UK The Newgate Building and The Gate, Newcastle - June 2015

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History

The Newgate building, located in Newcastle City Centre was built in the early 1900’s. The Grade II listed structure, with its twin towers, ornate clock faces, sweeping curves and large windows, is a famous landmark in the city. After the 1901 site was redeveloped in 1932, it functioned as a popular shopping destination, insofar as it was considered to have been one of the most elegant venues in Newcastle for many years. In addition to the shopping areas, the building also boasted having a four room dance suite which accommodated various events ranging from cabaret nights, ballroom dancing, dance auditions, wedding receptions, corporate functions and Christmas parties. Marian, aged 76, a former sorter from 1950-56, in an interview with the Newcastle Chronicle newspaper, suggested that “it was a marvellous place to work, there was no bickering, no back-biting and if you were behind with your work people would always come and help you outâ€. In later years the entire site was best recognised as ‘the Co-op building’ since there was a large Co-op located inside. The Newgate Building closed in December 2011, to make way for a new major leisure development, a six story hotel, restaurants and a gym complex. Initially, when plans were being drawn to renovate the area in 2007, the building was estimated to be worth £25 million, however, it was eventually sold for £12 million after property prices plummeted.

The Gate, which is next door to the Newgate building, was constructed in the early 2000’s and was opened on 28th November 2002. It cost approximately £80 million and was built by Land Securities. The venue is a large retail and leisure complex spread across three floors. It includes a 16 screen cinema, a casino, and a number of bars, restaurants and nightclubs. In 2010, Jamie Ritblat’s property company, Delancey purchased The Gate as part of a £900 million package of properties from the PropInvest Group. In 2012, however, it was sold to the Crown Estate for £60 million.

Our Version of Events

After our success in Charlton Bonds the sun was already rising and the start of a new day was already upon us. So, since the sun was up, we made a unanimous decision to skip the usual bedtime routine and crack on with something else. Next then, we came across the old Co-op building with its famous towers and, despite the lack of scaffolding, we managed to find a way inside. We were soon enjoying the early sunrise across Newcastle City Centre from up top. It was, however, quite surprisingly – since it is June after all, fairly chilly up on top; there was even a decent layer of ice on the roof. Even so, after grabbing a few shots of the towers and the surrounding bits of city, it wasn’t long before we decided to skate over to The Gate rooftop, which can be access from up there, to have a look at the view from a different angle. By now the darkness had completely disappeared, but it was worth it to see the early morning clouds roll into the city over the bridges.

Just as it was time to leave, after having spent a fair bit of time up there, we realised that we’d not actually been on top of either of the towers. So, before leaving we set off in search of a way in – at least one that involved less climbing and was less nippy on the fingers. Several minutes or so later, we did indeed discover an extremely small hatch and although it took a fair bit of contortionist skill to get past this obstacle we managed to get inside one of the clock towers. It was worth it; it always is to get a little higher.

Explored with Ford Mayhem and Soul.

1: The Newgate Building (Taken After the Explore)

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2: Early Morning on Newgate

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3: One of the Towers

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4: St. James Park and a Crane

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5: The Two Towers

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6: One of the Clock Faces

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7: Inside the Newgate Building

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8: The Small Gap in the Hatch

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9: From Newgate Tower

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10: Flagpole

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11: Early Morning Fog

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12: Newcastle City

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13: More of Newcastle City

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14: The Gate Rooftop

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15: Window Cleaning Rig

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16: View from The Gate

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17: Looking Over The Gate

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18: The Towers from The Gate

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19: Rooftop Bits and Bobs

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20: Icy Floors

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Nothing like getting high and watching the sunrise.

Looks good that and a nice view over the Newcastle :thumb

:comp:

It was a bit nippy for some, but the views were worth it :thumb

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Some lovely views over the city there mate. Bet that gap in the hatch took a bit of ball crunching to get through!

Mate, that gap was so fucking small lol. Didn't think we'd be getting back out. That worrying moment - the point of no return - when you manage to pop through.

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History

8: The Small Gap in the Hatch

DSC_0205a_zpsueihb0xi.jpg

SMALL gap, that's tiny. I bet that was a right squeeze, but worth the effort by the looks of it. :-)

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SMALL gap, that's tiny. I bet that was a right squeeze, but worth the effort by the looks of it. :-)

Yeah. We thought it was going to be a one way trip after initially getting through :D

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