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urbexdevil

UK Houghton Grange, Cambridgeshire, April 2015

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Think this is the correct section to share this one, not that there's much to share. The site is huge but the main building is sealed tight and being watched like a hawk with the most technical cameras I have ever seen.

Here's what I did get anyway, not much but still!

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Looks cool, worth the research to infiltrate... :thumb there will be a route through where the friendly secca cant see you :P

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Like the look of that old part to the left, got any pics from in there? :)

It's proper sealed and covered by a ridiculous array of cameras and alarms sadly...

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Cool share :thumb

There honestly not a great deal left in the main house you could see is had some nice features in its early days but had been converted to manky offices and a meeting room when the site was being used for research purposes.

Years back some old secca guy just opened it for us when we were chatting to him and the only place he didn't want us to go was the cellar as said was being used for achieving I think he said or storage cant remember which?

Have no Idea what I ever did with the pictures as cant find them?

A nice bit of info on the Grange here if interested?

https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=4&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CDUQFjADahUKEwi0j4rt27rHAhUImtsKHZKjC2w&url=http%3A%2F%2Farchiseek.com%2F2014%2F1898-houghton-grange-huntingdon-cambridgeshire%2F&ei=KmLXVbTSFIi07gaSx67gBg&usg=AFQjCNH297PhKg069TmFsmymZZ7jVHoRQA&sig2=9xMhtinhi2-ZgxjmHRazgg

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