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Stussy

Radio Farm, Scotland - June 2015

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Another boring topic from my venture up North.

Nothing much to say about this wee derp farm, spotted it from the main road, a quick de-tour and few photos later, you have this!

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Derp.

Thanks for looking!

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I bloody love those radios mate.

Haha cheers dude, shame its a LOT further north than your going this weekend haha!

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