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MrObvious

Royal Hospital Haslar Oct 15

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a quick walk around inside the notorious Royal Hospital Haslar in the night.

History

you probably all know by now :P

The Visit

Ive been to this location so many times now, nothing interesting actually happened, just wanted to get some footage inside before its completely gone, because i heard theyre starting to strip the place now :)

Edited by MrObvious

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Cool video that mate :thumb

I tried to re-embed too but still not working :(

thanks man :thumb the one i uploaded last night worked straight away lol, strange

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Cool video mate hope the rumors about it being stripped aren't true :( one of my fave places!

thanks mate, and yeah they are :( they've taken out all of the beds, waiting rooms etc already

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      1.
       

      2. Waiting for the tourist bus...
       

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      7. Doctor's changing room.
       

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      23. One from the modern(ish) villa, probably 1930's built.
       

      24. Basement view of the main building with day room and 'cells' beyond, long used for storage. 
       

      25.  
       

      26. Infirmary.
       

      27. Interesting club house with maintenance shed attached. Note the tree timbers supporting the porch.
       
       
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