Jump to content
WildBoyz

UK Bethel Chapel, Newtown - October 2015

Recommended Posts

History

Bethel Methodist Chapel was the third Calvinist chapel to be built in Newtown, the largest town in the county of Powys, Wales. It was originally constructed in 1810, and was later replaced in 1820. The present chapel was constructed on the site between 1875 and 1876. The Gothic style building, with its gable entry plan and flanking turrets, was designed by Richard Owens of Liverpool who was a distinguished architect at that time. The entire construction cost just over £2,300; most of this went towards the front elevation which is squared in masonry and sandstone dressings, the two buttresses to the main gable which at one time featured two individual spirelets, a large central wooden door and the slate roof tiles. The remainder of the building was constructed out of an inexpensive yellow brick. It is estimated that the former chapel once seated approximately 450 people.

Although the former chapel was sold back in 2008/2009, it has since fallen into a bad state of repair. Initial plans expected to redevelop the site into residential accommodation or offices, but no such work was ever initiated. Internal water damage has caused a number of the wooden floorboards to disintegrate throughout the building, and a section of the upper balcony has collapsed under its own weight since a number of slates have fallen off the roof causing the roof above to decay rapidly.

Our Version of Events

With the Newport Transporter conquered, it was time to move on. However, owing to various people’s work commitments and other things, rather than heading further south we decided to head up through Wales instead. It had been a while since we’d all been there and there was plenty of cracking scenery to take in, so it seemed like a good idea. With plenty of driving to do before we reached the north east once again though, we decided to take a pit stop in the small town of Newtown because we’d heard that there was a pleasant little abandoned chapel there. As it turned out, there was indeed an abandoned chapel there.

Access was pretty straightforward, which was a little disappointing after the challenge we had earlier the previous evening to get on the bridge, but we carried on and decided to take a look anyway. The chapel was smaller inside than it looks from the outside, and aside from the main navel there are only a couple of other empty rooms. The main body of the chapel itself still retains most of the classic features; namely its pews, the stained glass windows, an altar and the upper balcony, so they certainly made up for the disappointing overall size. We spent around twenty minutes there before we decided to crack on and make a move. Onwards and upwards was our main intention that day.

Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do, The Hurricane, Box and Husky.

1: Bethel Chapel

DSC_0187a_zpswtd6jfs2.jpg

2: Stained Glass up the Staircase

DSC_0130a_zpsq10usuzw.jpg

3: The Upper Balcony

DSC_0132a_zpseeehafmd.jpg

4: Looking Down at Bethel Chapel's Navel

DSC_0141a_zpsy3py0pce.jpg

5: Trying to get the Roof in too

DSC_0142a_zpsgnorpukf.jpg

6: Intact Stained Glass

DSC_0143a_zpsrisx2z9g.jpg

7: Heading Downstairs

DSC_0152a_zpswhbqx6li.jpg

8: The Backrooms

DSC_0153a_zpskserdrat.jpg

9: The Kitchen

DSC_0154a_zpsgbedfbmz.jpg

10: Even More Stained Glass

DSC_0156a_zpsrtz8r5bi.jpg

11: Standing at the Altar

DSC_0158a_zpscnnksn3s.jpg

12: Rotten Floorboards

DSC_0171a_zpsyv8lxqli.jpg

13: Rows of Pews

DSC_0173a_zpswgyfeqx7.jpg

14: Front Entrance Window

DSC_0177a_zpsep94n3wa.jpg

15: The Old Wooden Door

DSC_0179a_zpsze1e4pvt.jpg

16: Bethel Chapel External Shot

DSC_0184a_zpsdxbtwlqe.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Liking that quite a lot mate despite being so small. Have to agree on walk ins being boring, part of the fun is the challenge!

:comp:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like the look of that a lot!! Not so sure on the colour of the wall... that decorator needs the sack :thumb

Wish more churches had the glass as intact as this place :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Liking that quite a lot mate despite being so small. Have to agree on walk ins being boring, part of the fun is the challenge!

:comp:

Yeah, I prefer the challenge to get into these places, but this was quite a pleasant pit stop on our way through Wales. Not often you find so much intact stained glass in one place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Like the look of that a lot!! Not so sure on the colour of the wall... that decorator needs the sack :thumb

Wish more churches had the glass as intact as this place :D

Thanks mate. It's a bit small, but the navel was awesome. I agree with you on the overall decor in the place :D Tragic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good stuff mate I like # 11 :D we was gonna go here a couple months back whilst we was over that way but sacked it off, wish I didnt now :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Good stuff mate I like # 11 :D we was gonna go here a couple months back whilst we was over that way but sacked it off, wish I didnt now :(

Thanks man.

Haha, we were the same, but decided to have a quick look anyway while we were stretching our legs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By crabb
      Falcon house. It's been in Swindon since the early days of this towns birth and has been sat empty and abandoned for 16 years.  
      It was said to be the very first headquarters for the well known company zurich, an insurance company, but was promptly moved to a more practical and efficient property.
      The old office block is situated in Swindon town centre on top of a car park right near the entrance to town, which is an eye sore to some but a worthy explore for us. 
      There was nothing much left, only old phones and some really old school computer stuff. 
      It was the view at the end of the video that made it all worth it, being the second highest point in the town aside from the john murray building.  What a view! 
      So please enjoy this video by my good friend and make sure to check out the channel! Have fun out there,
      C
       
    • By jane doe
      Snowdown was the deepest colliery in Kent reaching well over 3,000 ft (915 metres). It was also the hottest and most humid pit in Kent and was given the name 'Dante's Inferno' by the miners. Regarded by many as the worst pit to work at in Britain, most Snowdown miners worked naked because clothes became too uncomfortable. The miners could consume around 24 pints (14 lires) of water in an 8-hour shift. There were frequent cases of heat stroke.

      Snowdown closed in 1987










    • By jane doe
      Established in 1926, G.L. Murphy was a family run business and supplied bespoke machinery to the tanning industry, as well as building rag cutting and cable stripping machinery.  The company also provide refurbishment and renovation works for various machinery types. 












    • By crabb
      What's left of the south marston hotel, remains an empty, scorched shell. Not much to see on this one, and I am way to late but hey, it still provides an eerie vibe. And the photos came out pretty good too. Thanks,
      C









    • By jane doe
      Predannack opened in 1941 as an RAF base, but today is the satellite airfield to RNAS Culdrose - it is a restricted MOD site and an active airfield used daily for flying training and also provides our Fire Fighting training facility. The area is heavily utilised by Culdrose helicopter squadrons, light fixed wing aircraft and, on an occasional basis by other aircraft types including jet aircraft, for a variety of reasons. Predominantly crews are involved in intensive training sorties involving a high cockpit workload. On average there is in excess of 2000 aircraft moves a month at the unit. The airfield is also used by the Fire Training School for live fire fighting and rescue instruction/exercises and there is also a rifle range at Predannack which is frequently used for live weapon firings. Additionally the airfield is used for a variety of additional tasks when the Control Tower is unmanned e.g. gliding.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
×