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MrT

Clipstone colliery, Clipstone, December 2015

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A personal favourite of myn. Had two visits here, one with no camera and another quick visit, due to pikeys being in here stripping it and one following me around, i valued my camera gear and my life so i left with only a handful of snapshots. Now well secured, with intercom warning if you get within a few metres of the perimeter.

Clipstone Colliery was a coal mine situated near the village of the same name on the edge of an area of Nottinghamshire known as “The Dukeries†because of the number of stately homes in the area. The colliery was owned by the Bolsover Colliery Company and passed to the National Coal Board in 1947. The headstocks and powerhouse are grade II listed buildings.

The colliery was sunk to exploit the Barnsley seam or “Tophardâ€, as it known locally. In the 1950s the shafts were deepened to over 1000 yards (920 m) to exploit other seams.

The colliery was closed by British Coal, as the National Coal Board had become, in 1993 and reopened by RJB Mining (now UK Coal) in April 1994, the licence to dig for coal being limited to the Yard seam which is located at a depth of 957 yards (870 m). The colliery was finally closed in April 2003.

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Thanks for looking guys and gals :)

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Nice to see this crop up again. I visited here a long time ago, and seems not a lot has changed really. Was the first (and only) headstock I've climbed.

Did you manage to get up the headstock?

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Nice to see this crop up again. I visited here a long time ago, and seems not a lot has changed really. Was the first (and only) headstock I've climbed.

Did you manage to get up the headstock?

This was a while back now, got a bit of the way up the headstocks, not to top. Must pop back v soon and take a look what's happening here.

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The last thing I can remember seeing from here was them topping the palisade fencing with an electric fence and installing cameras, motion detectors and alarms along it's length as well. I guess they don't want anyone falling off...

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The last thing I can remember seeing from here was them topping the palisade fencing with an electric fence and installing cameras, motion detectors and alarms along it's length as well. I guess they don't want anyone falling off...

Went back for a 3rd visit ages ago, see all the new security, laughed and haven't been back since. The headstocks and part of the building is grade 2 I believe, must get back and take a look to see what's going on here nowadays.

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Looks sweet inside there but sod getting robbed by pikeys. When was your last visit mate? The title date should reflect when you visited if possible.... Cheers :thumb

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On ‎12‎/‎4‎/‎2015‎ ‎10‎:‎27‎:‎37‎, The_Raw said:

Looks sweet inside there but sod getting robbed by pikeys. When was your last visit mate? The title date should reflect when you visited if possible.... Cheers :thumb

Sorry dude, ill know for future posts. Ill have to check exif, be a few years ago.

 

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