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Great Britain Wolsingham Train Depot - Dec 2020

Urbandoned

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Wolsingham Train Depot



Taken from the window of the also abandoned Wolsingham steelworks offices.

The history of this place is quite fascinating and we only found out how historic the property is after visiting.

Charles Attwood founded an iron works in Wolsingham and patented a new method of steelmaking. The Ironworks were a major employer in Wolsingham from 1864, producing steel from Weardale iron ore. When Charles Attwood died his nephew took over the company and traded as John Rogerson & Co until 1930. Steel castings were produced for use in both shipbuilding and munitions. The firm made a major contribution to the war effort in both World Wars. Electric arc furnaces were installed around 1950 but trade declined and the works closed in 1984. Manufacture continued for a time on a smaller scale run by a workers cooperative. It appears that the train depot was built during the steelworks period of use, as a building without that purpose. It may have been converted as the factory grew in size and a railway was necessary, but it's final use was a train depot. The ironworks finally closed in 2008 and was demolished, leaving some offices on the roadside behind and the transport shed.




We had seen this one online as another 'secret spot' and had reason to believe it was up north. It did take a while with minimal externals, but one Winter night, I spent a good few hours tracking it down and wanted to go right away. It didn't seem like the sort of place that would remain lacking in vandalism in the UK, and also was quite special. Before the lockdown, we headed up there for sunrise and everything went swimmingly, spending way too long inside for the open space available.





Immediately inside, you can see why this place is out of the ordinary. Not taking away from the 60s-80s trains, the building itself is very dated and contains some nice architecture.

The blue Mark 2 car that snaked over the two lanes in the shed.







The front cabin of the Mark 2, beside an old brake van.



Inside the Mark 2.





Mail compartment.



Cabin.





Further up the train, it began to get slightly more stripped and decayed. The buffet car was difficult to walk through with seats and cushions piled on the floor.







Heading towards the red Mark 1 at the north end of the shed. We were very intrigued to see what lay inside this one, due to the first class signs on every window and the older style of design.







A private booth inside. Sadly, this older carriage was only one car long.









Note the decorative throws on each seat and the ornate light fittings.



Following a look inside each train that wasn't freight, the rest of our time here was spent on the various gantry walkways that run parallel all the way along the tracks as well as on the roof of the trains. The two options definitely gave the best view of the site.















A little wholesome picture to finish with.

Here is the link to our documentary styled video filmed at the transport shed. We cover the building's past, present and future through cinematics and narration:


Thanks for reading :)
 

Gigi

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Great report! Quite a nice spot!
 

jane doe

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That is lovely ...you captured it beautifully , love the lace covers on the headrests ...well done guys :)
 

jtza

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Thoroughly enjoyed this explore. Well constructed report mate :)
 
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The_Raw

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Pretty damn sweet that, especially the more decorative carriages :love:
 
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